From Flower to Jar

When the first flowers blossom, “forager” bees begin the busy task of going incessantly back and forth between flowers and the hive, methodically collecting nectar. In the hive, the foragers are keenly awaited by other worker bees who receive the precious nectar. The nectar is passed from one bee to another, until it is stored in a cell in the comb: with each step it becomes more concentrated, it is enriched with enzymes and, once the honey is ready, the bees seal the cell with a layer of wax: for the beekeeper this signals harvest time! After months spent looking after the bees, at long last the beekeeper can remove the combs full of honey from the super frame, the part of the hive dedicated to collection, without jeopardising the reserves essential to the colony. After uncapping the beeswax that seals the cells, the beekeeper places the frames in a “honey extractor”, which spins the frames to remove the honey by centrifugal force without harming the combs. The extracted honey is kept in a decanting tank to eliminate any impurities, such as pieces of wax, and then transferred to drums, ready to be sent for packing…